Too many conversations lately go something like this:

Me to startup leader: are you Agile?

Startup leader to me:  as Agile as our clients let us be.

Image: choreography by Ann Carlson, used with permission.  More at

When I speak to various groups on The Agile Mindset, I point out that enlightening clients about the benefits of Agile begins with conversations leading up to the initial agreement.  While it’s less important to negotiate a contract than it is to simply collaborate with the customer, language choices do tend to support certain ways of working.

I was pretty pleased with my last experience using a Scrum-friendly contract.  The client said, “Wow, this is short!”  I replied, “Yep, let’s get to work!”

As always, get legal advice from a qualified attorney when you need it.  This is not legal advice.  I offer these sample blurbs as building blocks for your consideration.


The following items shall be presented for acceptance:

  1. Project backlog – revised monthly or as needed

  2. Retrospective report with relevant recommendations for improvement – monthly or as needed


The relationship between Client  and the Consultant will be managed and sustained by [NAME OF PRODUCT OWNER], who will be responsible for articulating goals and requirements and formally “accepting” the delivery of the work agreed-upon.

Since projects benefit from regular, purposeful, bi-directional communication, meetings shall be scheduled as follows – [INSERT SCHEDULE OF CEREMONIES].  Consultant will remain available – face to face whenever possible – offering reasonable response times, and shall expect that the Client shall be similarly available and supply all information and data as needed to complete the work to mutual satisfaction.

Consultant is happy to use any tools or processes preferred by Client.  Consultant will follow an Agile framework, which is a proven way of getting things done based on principles of entrepreneurial science.  As an Agile practitioner, the Consultant will help identify strategic opportunities to increase business value for the Client, believing that:

  • People and interactions are more important than processes and tools.

  • Working product is more important than extensive documentation.

  • Close collaboration is more important than contract negotiation.

  • Responding to change is more important than following a plan.

Last four bullet points are from The Manifesto for Agile Software Development


Recently I received this note and cheerful query from a colleague who runs a B2B custom software development company.

“Good news!  I think I may have convinced a client to use Scrum methods for their next project.

However I’m not really sure how to draw up the project’s contract.  Most of my contracts have very specific tasks and use change orders every time the spec changes.  This doesn’t seem like it would work with a Scrum project.  Any recommendations?”

So I sent him the above, and added a closing line which applies across the board.  Should you ever need backup helping your clients ‘let’ you be more Agile, be in touch for a consultation!